Wild Ride

horse-reaching-over-fence

Horses are large mammals capable of being human pets or profit animals. They have hooves that can kill you with one blow and large front teeth to bite, which seriously hurts! They sometimes will step on you, that hurts, they may bang you with their head, that also hurts, but other than those reasons they are a fun, lazy, goofy, loving animals.

Their big ears let them hear things farther away then any human, cat, or dog could hear. Have you ever noticed a horse swivel it’s ears around in different directions or even in the same direction? Look at where the ears or one of the ears are pointing. That is where they are directing their ears to because something has caught their interest or attention and they want to keep track of it by listening to it. If you’re riding a horse their ears will often swivel back and be trained on you. That usually means they’re listening to you and awaiting instruction.

Now let’s talk about their eyes. Horses don’t see the world like humans do. They can see almost all the way behind them with just one eye! Their vision is way more expanded than any human’s vision. This sometimes makes it hard to tell where they are looking though. However, a good way to tell if they are starring at something is to look at their muzzle and ears. If the muzzle is pointed in one direction and the ears are pointed forward in that direction, then that’s where they are looking.

Last of all let’s take a look at those legs. Wow they’re long! The fastest horses can gallop at about 35 to 40 mph! They’re long legs allow them to take much longer strides, and cover more distance faster. Unfortunately those legs are often fragile so you have to be careful not to over exert them. What if you had to hold 1,000 pounds on those toothpicks?  A horse needs all of it’s legs in order to live because just three or even less cannot support their immense weight. That is why generally if a horse breaks a leg you have to put it down, You can try to fix it, but it is extremely expensive and there is a very low chance that their leg will be able to be mended.

This then concludes my horse blog.

 

 

 

 

 

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